The Film Stage

Berlinale Review: Sleep with Your Eyes Open Vividly Captures the Migrant Condition
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Tucked deep into Don DeLillo’s Underworld is an exchange between the novel’s protagonist, Nick Shay, and one of his teachers, a Jesuit priest. It concerns language. The priest, to make a point about the boy’s abysmally poor vocabulary, taunts him...
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Gore Verbinski, Ridley Scott, Mélanie Laurent & More Set Next Films
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It’s hard to believe it’s been nearly a decade since the last film from Gore Verbinski, 2016’s A Cure for Wellness, but after being attached to a handful of projects, the director is finally looking to return. Sam Rockwell, Haley...
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Yorgos Lanthimos Sets Next Film with Save the Green Planet Remake, Produced by Ari Aster
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Update: As we predicted, Emma Stone will reunite with Yorgo Lanthimos for the film in a supporting role, Variety reports. Following up Poor Things, Yorgos Lanthimos already has another film in the can with The post Yorgos Lanthimos Sets Next...
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Berlinale Review: Oliver Assayas Blends Passions and Personal History in Breezy Comedy Suspended Time
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The memes won’t let you forget, but 2019 was half a decade ago. That was also the year Olivier Assayas’ Wasp Network––an odd return to the realm of his TV series Carlos, and subsequently picked up by Narcos-era Netflix––premiered at...
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Berlinale Review: Bruce LaBruce’s The Visitor is a Love Letter to Pasolini, Penned With Blood, Sweat, and Semen
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It’s safe to call Canadian artist and filmmaker Bruce LaBruce a Panorama mainstay; it’s been two decades and counting since Hustler White premiered in this Berlinale strand in 1996. Between The Misandrists (Panorama, 2017) and his latest, The Visitor (Panorama...
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New Trailer for Love Lies Bleeding Highlights the Lesbian Bodybuilding Neo-Noir of the Year
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One of the most purely entertaining viewing experiences at Sundance Film Festival this year was Rose Glass’ Love Lies Bleeding, which is quite a level up in terms of ideas from her debut Saint Maud. Starring Kristen Stewart, Katy O’Brian, Jena...
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Rotterdam Review: Toshihiko Tanaka’s Rei is an Ambitious Directorial Debut That Draws from Hamaguchi
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It was more than eight years ago that the virtually unknown Ryusuke Hamaguchi premiered Happy Hour, a five-hour narrative masterclass about four thirty-something women coming to terms with their own lives and relationship to one another. Against all odds, Hamaguchi...
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Ennio Review: A Simplistic Overview of a Towering Career
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“A director can’t understand the final result from a description. You cannot describe music; it needs to be listened to.” So says Ennio Morricone in one of many talking-head sections that comprise Giuseppe Tornatore’s documentary. But Ennio, as it’s aptly...
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The Monk and the Gun Review: Bhutan’s Oscar Entry is a Too-Gentle, Offbeat Crime Caper Meets Political Dramedy
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There is very little written in the English language about the cinema of Bhutan, with only the broadest overviews of this still-emerging industry to be found at a glance. Not producing its first feature until the 1990s––and not producing one...
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Mia Wasikowska Wants to Purify Your Body in First Trailer for Jessica Hausner’s Club Zero
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Across her five previous features, Austrian director Jessica Hausner (Amour Fou, Lourdes, Little Joe) has developed a distinctly unique tone and now she’s back with her sixth outing, Club Zero. Led by Mia Wasikowska, the dark satire follows a nutrition...
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